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Paris: Montmartre street view of Sacré-Cœur Basilica

——

And these streets

they falter

under the weight

of it all:

the joy,

the despair,

the endless

striving

for something,

anything

to 

hold onto.

——

Taken on an afternoon in Paris with my Sony A7R while wandering around Montmartre for hours with no particular plan. 

Sometimes those are the best kind of afternoons.


——

View: My travel photography portfolio, My Photography Book Releasing in Autumn, 2014, My NYC Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

Paris: Montmartre street view of Sacré-Cœur Basilica

——

And these streets

they falter

under the weight

of it all:

the joy,

the despair,

the endless

striving

for something,

anything

to

hold onto.

——

Taken on an afternoon in Paris with my Sony A7R while wandering around Montmartre for hours with no particular plan.

Sometimes those are the best kind of afternoons.

——

View: My travel photography portfolio, My Photography Book Releasing in Autumn, 2014, My NYC Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

Times Square in the Snow - New York City (some updates about my book too!)

nythroughthelens:



I wanted to sincerely thank everyone for such an incredible outpouring of love regarding my New York City coffee table book: NY Through The Lens. I, honestly, was gob-smacked this past weekend  when responding to the comments on my various posts about the book on Facebook, Twitter,  Google +,  Tumblr and  Instagram. 

I feel so spoiled by all of you! Seriously. 

I think a lot about a passage written by E.M. Forster that really resonated with me back when I was a budding Literary Criticism & Theory major:


Only connect! That was the whole of her sermon. 
Only connect the prose and the passion, and both will be exalted, 
And human love will be seen at its height. 
Live in fragments no longer. 
Only connect…

—E.M. Forster, Howards End

Forster’s characters are constantly plagued by dilemmas that stunt true connection despite the positive implications of the phrase. While Forster’s usage of the phrase has different meanings colored by the context of the era he was writing about, I have always thought about the phrase in the context of sharing pieces of ourselves in an era of surface sharing on the internet. We share a lot in the hopes of some sort of connection but actual connections seem mired in ambiguity and pretense.

When I started to share my (often) emotional writing and photography, I felt incredibly vulnerable (I still do, to be honest). But every time I get an email or message or comment that indicates that someone else felt the feelings I described in my writing or conveyed with my photography, it’s one of the most beautiful feelings. 

I still close my eyes and click or tap on the Submit button on my blog sometimes because what I write and what I convey with my photography is so intensely personal. But it all feels worthwhile during life moments like this one.

So, thank you for that.

——

Updated info about the book:

I updated my blog post that contains pre-sale links with some edits to answers and updated questions:

New York City Coffee Table Book: NY Through The Lens

Updates include:

1 - The page counts are actually the same for the paperback version and the hardcover version. It’s an Amazon foible that has them listed differently. It will be corrected soon.

2 - There are updated links for the UK version of the book as well as a separate link for those who live in Australia as Booktopia Australia has the book listed which will cut down on shipping costs for those down under!

3 -  I have also answered the number one question I received about purchasing the book in other parts of Europe and Asia:

Answer: Here is the low-down on the book’s release. It is available in the English language on Amazon throughout most of Europe (and parts of Asia).

If you go to your country’s Amazon and search for: NY Through The Lens, my book will show up. This is your own country’s option for purchasing the book. Just remember that the shipping will be local and the currency will be friendly to where you live but the book will be in English.

Hope this helps!

Again, if you missed the flurry of announcements and are totally lost right now. Here is the original announcement about the book along with TONS of info, photos, and answers to questions:

New York City Coffee Table Book: NY Through The Lens

Much love, 

V.

P.S. - I will get back to posting about my South of France, Paris, and Martinique adventures soon! We left off in Nice. I didn’t forget ;). Also, newer NYC photography! I have some exciting NYC adventures coming up.

P.P.S. - I also added a handy link to my book post to my navigation bar over on  my blog. If you are on a laptop or desktop, the navigation bar is under my blog title. If you are on mobile (as I am mainly these days), the navigation bar is nested below the first page of blog content. 

—- 



View: My New York City photography portfolio, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

Times Square in the Snow - New York City (some updates about my book too!)

nythroughthelens:

I wanted to sincerely thank everyone for such an incredible outpouring of love regarding my New York City coffee table book: NY Through The Lens. I, honestly, was gob-smacked this past weekend when responding to the comments on my various posts about the book on Facebook, Twitter, Google +, Tumblr and Instagram.

I feel so spoiled by all of you! Seriously.

I think a lot about a passage written by E.M. Forster that really resonated with me back when I was a budding Literary Criticism & Theory major:

Only connect! That was the whole of her sermon.

Only connect the prose and the passion, and both will be exalted,

And human love will be seen at its height.

Live in fragments no longer.

Only connect…

—E.M. Forster, Howards End

Forster’s characters are constantly plagued by dilemmas that stunt true connection despite the positive implications of the phrase. While Forster’s usage of the phrase has different meanings colored by the context of the era he was writing about, I have always thought about the phrase in the context of sharing pieces of ourselves in an era of surface sharing on the internet. We share a lot in the hopes of some sort of connection but actual connections seem mired in ambiguity and pretense.

When I started to share my (often) emotional writing and photography, I felt incredibly vulnerable (I still do, to be honest). But every time I get an email or message or comment that indicates that someone else felt the feelings I described in my writing or conveyed with my photography, it’s one of the most beautiful feelings.

I still close my eyes and click or tap on the Submit button on my blog sometimes because what I write and what I convey with my photography is so intensely personal. But it all feels worthwhile during life moments like this one.

So, thank you for that.

——

Updated info about the book:

I updated my blog post that contains pre-sale links with some edits to answers and updated questions:

New York City Coffee Table Book: NY Through The Lens

Updates include:

1 - The page counts are actually the same for the paperback version and the hardcover version. It’s an Amazon foible that has them listed differently. It will be corrected soon.

2 - There are updated links for the UK version of the book as well as a separate link for those who live in Australia as Booktopia Australia has the book listed which will cut down on shipping costs for those down under!

3 - I have also answered the number one question I received about purchasing the book in other parts of Europe and Asia:

Answer: Here is the low-down on the book’s release. It is available in the English language on Amazon throughout most of Europe (and parts of Asia).

If you go to your country’s Amazon and search for: NY Through The Lens, my book will show up. This is your own country’s option for purchasing the book. Just remember that the shipping will be local and the currency will be friendly to where you live but the book will be in English.

Hope this helps!

Again, if you missed the flurry of announcements and are totally lost right now. Here is the original announcement about the book along with TONS of info, photos, and answers to questions:

New York City Coffee Table Book: NY Through The Lens

Much love,

V.

P.S. - I will get back to posting about my South of France, Paris, and Martinique adventures soon! We left off in Nice. I didn’t forget ;). Also, newer NYC photography! I have some exciting NYC adventures coming up.

P.P.S. - I also added a handy link to my book post to my navigation bar over on my blog. If you are on a laptop or desktop, the navigation bar is under my blog title. If you are on mobile (as I am mainly these days), the navigation bar is nested below the first page of blog content.

—-

View: My New York City photography portfolio, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

Essential reading for lovers of New York City

nythroughthelens:

NY Through The Lens - The Book!

I am super excited to announce this news!

My New York City photography book is currently available for pre-sale on Amazon!

All of the photos in this post are in the book.

Here are some Questions and Answers about the book:

I live in the United States or Canada. What is the link to use to pre-order the book?

Use this link if you have a United States or Canada shipping address:

NY Through the Lens

I live in the UK, Australia, or New Zealand. What is the link to use to pre-order the book?

Use this link if you have a UK, Australia, or New Zealand shipping address:

New York Through the Lens

What are the release dates for the book?

United States and Canada release date: November 24, 2014.

UK, Australia and New Zealand release date: October 13,2014.

image

Will the book be releasing in physical stores as well?

Yes! I will have more information about that at a later date. I buy most of my books on Amazon though so I am happy that I have the Amazon information available right now for you.

image

Do you have any photos of what the book looks like?

Here is what the cover looks like:

image

The cover and physical book together:

image

Some sample pages:

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View images of more sample pages and the cover over at this album:

NY Through The Lens Book Images

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How many pages are in the book? What are the formats?

The United States and Canada version of the book is paperback and consists of 256 pages of photography and writing by yours truly.

The UK, Australia, and New Zealand version of the book is hardcover and consists of 192 pages of photography and writing.

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—-

General questions:

What part of NYC did you grow up in? Where do you live now?

I was born and raised in a borough of New York City called Queens. More specifically, I grew up in Flushing, Queens. I have lived in Manhattan for the past 11 years. I currently reside on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

image

When and how did you start photography? What inspires you?

I started taking photos in a rather stream-of-consciousness manner in the mid-2000s. Since I live in New York City, I don’t drive. Without much in the way of material things or financial prosperity, walking became my way to deal with stress. It also became a way for me to experience the city like I hadn’t before. I would choose a direction and walk as far as my feet would take me; I still do this. As the scenery unfolded before me, I began noticing lines, forms and structures that I‘d previously ignored. To embrace my new-found sense of wonder, I took the only camera I could afford at the time, a simple point-and-shoot costing less than $100, on my walking adventures. I just wanted to capture the moments and experiences that made my heart swell.

In 2010, I decided to finally post the photos I had accumulated along the way online. I knew nothing about posting photography online and had heard that blogs were a great place to post photography. I literally googled the word “blog” and Tumblr came up as the first search result. I I decided to create my blog, NY Through The Lens on Tumblr purely for myself.

Since I had no formal training in photography or in-depth knowledge of the rules and concepts defining the field, it didn’t occur to me that I’d have an audience for my work. I honestly didn’t think that anyone would be interested in what I was posting online to my Tumblr blog. However, within a few months of posting my photos to Tumblr, I amassed thousands of followers and I was both humbled and touched by the messages I would receive on a weekly basis.

Starting out in photography with limited tools enticed me to learn more about light, which in turn, has set me on a lifelong journey attempting to capture something as fleeting and vast as the transient quality of New York City and other places around the world.

That initial leap of posting my photography online to my Tumblr and eventually across social media started an epic adventure and led to photography and writing becoming my career. I am thankful everyday that I get to share my passion with an online audience of over 2.5 million. The ability to connect with people on a regular basis is something I never take for granted.

Currently, I am focused on distilling the essence of New York City and other places around the world into distinctive visual remnants that resonate in a variety of ways.

I am endlessly haunted by a sense of saudade and sehnsucht: a deep longing for a place that is unidentifiable but somehow familiar and indicative of what could be identified as home. I am on a neverending quest to attempt to imbue my photography with this complex notion of nostalgic longing.

Additionally, I am inspired by all of the things that different places symbolize for people and I try to examine and delve into these enduring symbols with my photography.

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Where can I find out more about you?

My About Page

Published Work, Conference and Events, and Media

Social Media Reach and Information about Brands

My Travel Blog

New York City Photography Collection

Travel Photography Collection

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Where else can I find you online?

Twitter

Instagram

Facebook

Google Plus

Flickr

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—-

All about cameras:

The most common question I get every day is what camera I shoot with. The photos in the book and the majority of the photos on my blog have been taken with Sony cameras.

I started using Sony cameras when I first began pursuing photography professionally back in 2010 based on the suggestion of a very close friend and a lot of research. I spoke on a blog panel during a photography conference in the summer of 2012. It was because of that amazing speaking opportunity that I became acquainted with Sony since someone from Sony was in the audience during my panel. I partnered with Sony in 2013 and became one of 10 contracted Sony Artisans of Imagery worldwide in April of 2014. The choice to partner with Sony was a natural one for me since I had already been enthusiastically using Sony cameras for my professional photography.

Because this photography book is inclusive of my photographic journey from the start up until now, it also includes photos that I took with my initial no-frills point-and-shoot camera as well as some mobile photos since I am very passionate about mobile photography.

Every photo in the book has a caption that indicates what camera was used as well as the settings used.

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—-

I hope you will enjoy my book. It’s been an enormous labor of love.

I want to thank everyone involved in the process: my UK publisher: Ilex Press, my US publisher: F+W Media, and…

you.

None of this would have been possible without you.

Much love to all of you for inspiring me every day to follow my passion.

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—-

View: My New York City photography photography portfolio, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

South of France: Nice

Nice is a visual feast.

The soft light toys with the entire spectrum of human emotion as if it is a paintbrush joyfully dragging itself through a colorful palette warmed by the Mediterranean sun.

To understand the level of enchantment that Matisse, Chagall, and countless other painters have felt through the decades in Nice, one only has to wander aimlessly through the streets in the summer when the sun is languidly descending in the sky.

—-

Nice is the second largest city on France’s Mediterranean coast. Due to its close proximity to Italy (it is located 20 miles west of Italy’s current border) and its geographic good fortune of being one of the busiest trading ports dating back to around 300 BC, it went through many different periods of ownership until it became a part of France in the 1800s.

The Italian influence is strong especially in the older parts of Nice where the narrow streets wind through rows and rows of ochre, and orange buildings, most of which date back to the 1700s.

The Port of Nice is located in the center of the city. This port serves as a main point of transfer to Corsica as there are ferries that travel to Corsica from the Port of Nice regularly.:

The colors of the walls in Vieux Nice are a stunning backdrop for its many restaurants, shops, and cafes. The South of France, much like many other Mediterranean cities and cultures, possesses a very laid-back attitude which carries over into every aspect of life. It’s almost impossible to feel the anxious rush that tends to hum along the periphery of life in cities like New York City, London, and Paris while in Nice. :

It’s in the quiet moments that Nice really blossoms:

After quiet moments:

(Click on the Read More below to see more photos from the Nice…)

Read more

Nice - South of France - Sunset in the Streets

—-

I have been slowly going through my photos from South of France which has proven to be a gargantuan task considering the sheer amount of content that I ended up with from each city I visited. 

I plan on posting quite a few photo-sets from each city as well as separate in-depth photo posts highlighting some of the unique aspects of each place. And, of course, I will also do the same for Paris since I ended up spending 10 days in Paris after the South of France journey was over. 

While I was in France, I posted quite a few photos in-the-moment and I typically did that with my cameras (I brought along my Sony corral which included the: A6000, A7R, and A7) by uploading the photos from the camera directly to my phone where I did super-quick edits of them using iOS photo-apps before posting them to Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and my travel blog. 

This photo means a lot to me. 

It was taken on the first evening that I was in Nice. 

The light was light I dreamed about when I was younger and would bury my head in books about far-off sun-drenched locations. 

I didn’t grow up in a family that traveled since my family didn’t have the means to travel. My father worked nights as a pressman for the Daily News, a fact which I was ashamed of when I was in grade school since it seemed like most of my peers had parents who had glamorous white-collar jobs which afforded them the means to travel. It took my parents 10 years to save up enough money to take a 2 week European vacation back in the 1990s without feeling intense guilt about allocating those funds for something other than necessities. 

And so, when I travel, I always get a bit emotional along the way (that’s a bit of an understatement). My eyes well-up when I think of how much I yearned to be able to experience travel when I was younger. And while travel is part of my career in photography, it’s still constantly amazing to me that I even get the opportunity to do what I do. 

I posted another version of this photo a month ago on the evening when it was taken. I stood there in Vieux Nice with the other journalists who were traveling with me and we all took turns admiring the light and capturing it with our cameras. 

I insisted we all do that because I knew this was the light that people dream about. 

It’s the kind of light that keeps you going even in your darkest hours when you are trying to claw your way into the life you have always wanted to live. 

And it’s the kind of light that just knowing it exists in reality is enough to keep the dreams alive.



——

View: My travel photography portfolio, My Gear List, My NYC Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

Nice - South of France - Sunset in the Streets

—-

I have been slowly going through my photos from South of France which has proven to be a gargantuan task considering the sheer amount of content that I ended up with from each city I visited.

I plan on posting quite a few photo-sets from each city as well as separate in-depth photo posts highlighting some of the unique aspects of each place. And, of course, I will also do the same for Paris since I ended up spending 10 days in Paris after the South of France journey was over.

While I was in France, I posted quite a few photos in-the-moment and I typically did that with my cameras (I brought along my Sony corral which included the: A6000, A7R, and A7) by uploading the photos from the camera directly to my phone where I did super-quick edits of them using iOS photo-apps before posting them to Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and my travel blog.

This photo means a lot to me.

It was taken on the first evening that I was in Nice.

The light was light I dreamed about when I was younger and would bury my head in books about far-off sun-drenched locations.

I didn’t grow up in a family that traveled since my family didn’t have the means to travel. My father worked nights as a pressman for the Daily News, a fact which I was ashamed of when I was in grade school since it seemed like most of my peers had parents who had glamorous white-collar jobs which afforded them the means to travel. It took my parents 10 years to save up enough money to take a 2 week European vacation back in the 1990s without feeling intense guilt about allocating those funds for something other than necessities.

And so, when I travel, I always get a bit emotional along the way (that’s a bit of an understatement). My eyes well-up when I think of how much I yearned to be able to experience travel when I was younger. And while travel is part of my career in photography, it’s still constantly amazing to me that I even get the opportunity to do what I do.

I posted another version of this photo a month ago on the evening when it was taken. I stood there in Vieux Nice with the other journalists who were traveling with me and we all took turns admiring the light and capturing it with our cameras.

I insisted we all do that because I knew this was the light that people dream about.

It’s the kind of light that keeps you going even in your darkest hours when you are trying to claw your way into the life you have always wanted to live.

And it’s the kind of light that just knowing it exists in reality is enough to keep the dreams alive.

——

View: My travel photography portfolio, My Gear List, My NYC Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.